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Ulf
01-26-2009, 11:22 PM
-What are haplogroups?

The topic of haplogroups is becoming an increasing source of interest with those that have received their Y-chromosome haplotypes. This is because your haplotype can give you hints to your ancient origins.

We’ve all seen illustrations that show the evolutionary branches of primates, and how millions of years ago, chimpanzees, gorillas, gibbons, and orang-utans diverged off from our primate family tree.


Man (hominids) went off in a different evolutionary direction, and there have been several different lines that have since died off, Neanderthals being a notable example. With his origins in Africa, modern man has spread himself around the globe. As he did so, he adapted to his surroundings. These adaptations can be seen in the lightened skin colour due to the lack of sun away from the equator, stockier build as observed in peoples in the Arctic regions to maintain body-heat, and better oxygen absorption capability as seen in inhabitants of mountainous, oxygen-poor regions.

Migration of humans over time (dates are in years before present)
http://www.dnaheritage.com/images/masterclass/world_migration2.gif

Over time, many mutations in the DNA strand have occurred. The Y-chromosome, whose main job is just to turn on the male baby switch, has also picked up mutations of a particular type as time has passed. This type of mutation is called a SNP (or Single Nucleotide Polymorphism). This is quite a simply where one letter of the DNA strand is changed to another letter (e.g. T changes to a A).

http://www.dnaheritage.com/images/masterclass/SNP.gif

These SNP’s are so rare as to be considered unique and are passed down faithfully from father to son. Because of this, they have been used to define several broad groups into which every male in the world can be placed in. These broad groups are called ‘haplogroups’.

As man has migrated around the world over time, these haplogroups can be used to trace their paths. This is incredibly useful and is an extra tool used alongside archaeological and linguistic data.


Because some haplotypes (from STR tests) are found to be common within particular haplogroups, it is very often possible to make a prediction of what your haplogroup is from your haplotype.

Where it becomes interesting for genealogists is that they can gain some insight into their very ’deep’ ancestry – i.e. thousands of years ago – of their direct paternal ancestors.


For example, when it comes to Europe, the haplogroups observed can be broadly split into two groups, Palaeolithic and Neolithic.

The first image (Map 1) shows Palaeolithic Europe 18,000 years ago in the grip of the last ice age. Glacial ice 2km thick covers much of Northern Europe and the Alps. Sea levels are approx. 125m lower than today and the coastline differs slightly from the present day. For example, Britain and Ireland would have been connected to continental Europe (not shown on map).

Map 1 - Ice age Europe (18,000 years ago)
http://www.dnaheritage.com/images/masterclass/europe_haplogroups_1.jpg

The air would have been on average 10-12 degrees cooler and much more arid. In between the ice and the tree line, drought-tolerant grasses and dunes would have dominated the landscape.

The Neanderthals would have died out around 14,000 years ago leaving the nomadic hunter-gatherer Cro-Magnon (modern man) to pursue the animals of the time. Due to the cold and the need for food, the populations of the day waited the ice age out in the three locations shown on the map. These were the Iberian Peninsula, the Balkans and the Ukraine.

These people were skilled in flint-knapping techniques and various tools such as end-scrapers for animal skins and burins for working wood and engraving were common. Cave painting using charcoal had been around for a couple of thousand years although at this time they were now more subtle than mere outline drawings. These artistic expressions are significant as it shows that people are able to obtain some leisure time. Whether this is ‘art for art’s sake’ or objects of ritual is not known.


If we fast forward to 12,000 years ago (Map 2), the ice has retreated and the land has become much more supportive to life. Many animal species have returned to inhabit the land, although the snake, harvest mouse and mole never made it as far as Ireland before the land bridges re-flooded (ever wondered why there are no snakes in Ireland?).

Map 2- spread of Haplogroups R1b, I and R1a (12,000 years ago)
http://www.dnaheritage.com/images/masterclass/europe_haplogroups_2.jpg

The three groups of humans had taken refuge for so long that their DNA had naturally picked up mutations, and consequently can be defined into different haplogroups. As they spread from these refuges, Haplogroups R1b, I and R1a propagated across Europe.

- Haplogroup R1b is common on the western Atlantic coast as far as Scotland.
- Haplogroup I is common across central Europe and up into Scandinavia.
- Haplogroup R1a is common in eastern Europe and has also spread across into central Asia and as far as India and Pakistan.

These three major haplogroups account for approx 80% of Europe's present-day population.


Around 8,000 years ago (Map 3), the Neolithic peoples of the Middle East that had developed the new technology of agriculture began moving into Europe. There were several haplogroups involved, mainly E3b, F, J2 and G2.

Map 3 - spread of Neolithic haplogroups (from 8,000 years ago)
http://www.dnaheritage.com/images/masterclass/europe_haplogroups_3.jpg

These Neolithic haplogroups came in several waves over time and are found predominantly along the Mediterranean coast. Around 20% of the present-day population are from these Neolithic haplogroups. What is interesting to note is that the agricultural technology spread much further than the people who first 'invented' it.

A little later, around 4,500 years ago, Haplogroup N3 began moving across from west of the Ural mountains. Haplogroup N3 follows closely the spread of the Finno-Ugric languages.

Source (http://www.dnaheritage.com/masterclass2.asp)

Brynhild
01-26-2009, 11:25 PM
I think more attention should also be focused on the MT-DNA haplogroups as well.

Psychonaut
01-26-2009, 11:29 PM
I think more attention should also be focused on the MT-DNA haplogroups as well.

This is true. Only looking at the y-DNA certainly gives you a skewed view of the genetic input in an area. For example, both the Faeroe Islands and Iceland have very significant levels of distinctly Scottish mt-DNA markers, whereas the y-DNA markers are almost entirely Scandinavian. Looking at the two of these together gives us a better picture of where the mates for many of these vikings came from. ;)

hereward
06-06-2010, 08:29 PM
The vast majority of Western European R1B subclades are found down stream of this subclade, which is defined by SNP P310. This Clade is found down stream R1b1b2 which is defined by the SNP mark M269, which in turn is responsible for the vast majority of all European R1b derived Subclades. The current proposed age of R1b1b2 is now deemed to be only 5000 – 8000 years old, as opposed to past estimations which held that the clade was around in Europe before the last Ice-age. R1b1b2a1a is dominated by two Subclades, R1b1b2a1a1 (U106/S21) and R1b1b2a1a2 (P312).

R1b1b2a1a1 (U106)

This subclade is defined by the SNP marker U106/S21, and accounts for over 25% of European R1b according to current research. R1b1b2a1a1 and its subsequent subclades are mainly founnd in at their highest frequencies in the ‘Historically Germanic’ area’s, their frequencies decline the further East and South you venture.

R1b1b2a1a1 as percentage of total Y-Dna by Nation

Netherlands 37.2%
Austria ` 22.7% (comparatively small sample size)
England 21.4%
Germany 20.5%
Denmark 17.7%
Czech Republic 13.9%
Switzerland 13.3%
Poland 08.2%
Russia 07.2%
France 07.1%
Ireland 05.9%
Italy 03.5%
Turkey 00.4%

Source: http://www.cmj.hr/2007/48/4/17696299.htm

U106 Subclades

R1b1b2a1a1a – Defined by U198/S29, found in low levels in; Netherlands(2.1%), Germany(1.8%), England(1.4%), Denmark(0.9%) and Russia(1.8)%.

R1b1b2a1a1c – Defined by L1/S26, found in low levels in Germany and England.

R1b1b2a1a1d – Defined by L48/S162, this Subclade is responsible for the bulk of R1b1b2a1a1 (U106) Subclades.

The Map below shows U106/S21(orange), S29(brown) and remaining R1b(pale yellow) has a percentage of Y-Dna Haplogroups in various Nations.

4921


R1b1b2a1a2 (P312)

This Subclade has been viewed to account for one half of all European R1b1b2, it is found all over Europe but is mainly concentrated in Western Europe.
P312 Subclades

R1b1b2a1a2b – Defined by M153, this Subclade is found in high numbers amongst the Basques and Gascons, with a lower amount throughout Iberia.

R1b1b2a1a2c – Defined by M167, this subclade is found in relatively high numbers in both the Basques and Catalans. In the rest of Spain, plus France, Netherlands, Germany and England, it is found at below 5%.

R1b1b2a1a2d – Defined by U152/S28, this subclade reaches its peak in the alpine area’s, which has led some to associate the subclade with the ‘La Tene Culture’. Out side of Switzerland, Southern Germany and Northern Italy it drops in number dramatically in all directions.

R1b1b2a1a2e – Defined by L21. Current tests results indicate this subclade being fairly common in Ireland, Britain, Northern France, Germany and Scandinavia, but rare in Iberia and Italy.

R1b1b2a1a2f2 – Defined by M222, this subclade is heavily associated with Ireland and Scotland, especially northern Ireland. It is also quite abundant in Western Ireland.

R1b1b2a1a2f4 – Defined by L226/S168, it is found throughout Ireland, especially Western and Central Ireland.


Other R1b Maps

4926

4927

4928

4929

hereward
06-06-2010, 11:42 PM
Haplogroup I represents around 20% of the European population, it is found in a majority of European nataions yet yet is virtually absent outside of Europe, leading most academics to believe that Haplogroup I is indigenous to Europe. It is currently held that the most recent common ancestor for this Clade lived some 21 000 years ago, this estimated age puts the appearance of I roughly at the onset of the Last Glacial Maximum. It diverged into two large European Subclades, I1(M253) and I2(M438).

4930

4931

I1(M253)

This subclade is deemed to have risen around 4-6000 years ago, it is strongly associated with the ‘Historical Germanic’ populations. It reaches a peak of 40+% saturation in an area covering Sweden, Denmark, most of Norway and Western Finalnd. The percentage drops has one moves further away from these area’s; Northern Germany, Netherlands and Northern England around 15%, Southern Germany and Southern England around 10%. Northern France is around 5%.
I1 has various subclades, unfortunately, these have not received the same amount of study as say, R1b, so not as much information is available for commentary.
One particular subclade, I1b defined by SNP M227, is found almost exclusively in low numbers amongst the Baltic and Slavic populations.

4932

I2(M438)

This subclade produced three important subclades, I2a1(M26), I2a2 (M423) and I2b(M436/P214/S33), covering varying populations throughout Europe.

I2a1(M26)

This subclade is believed to be greater than 4000 years old and it makes up a staggering 40% of the Sardinian Population. Significant frequencies have been found in the Basque Country, Castile and other parts of Spain. Outside of Sardinia, Iberia and Southwest France are very low values are recorded, in Eastern Europe it is virtually absent.

The map below shows the distribution of both I2a1 and I2a2
4933


I2a2 (M423)

This subclade reaches its peak in both Croatia and Bosnia, exceeding 50% in frequency. It is common in Slavic Countries, normally forming the Second or Third most numerous Haplotype found. This subclade also features significantly in Romania, Hungary and the remaining Balkland nations. It is viewed to be at least 3600 years old.

4934

I2b(M436/P214/S33)
This subclade has a strong correlation to I1, except in Northern Norway, Northern Sweden and Finland. This has led to geneticists connecting the two subclades to the ‘Historical Germanic’ populations. Its highest frequencies are attained in the Netherlands(6%), Denmark(5%), Germany(4.5%), England(4.5%) and Belgium(4%). It falls to very low frequencies the once you move further East and South.

Ibericus
06-20-2010, 02:17 AM
Updated map of R1b :

http://img193.imageshack.us/img193/6843/r1bf.png

Pallantides
06-20-2010, 02:28 AM
Updated map of R1b :

http://img193.imageshack.us/img193/6843/r1bf.png

Intresting that the strongest concentration of R1b in Norway is in the areas of Western and Southern Norway were there is a strong presence of Atlantids and Paleo-Atlantids.



If I remember correctly the highest frequency for R1b in Norway was in 'Møre og Romsdal' and 'Sogn og Fjordane'.

Ibericus
06-20-2010, 07:21 PM
Intresting that the strongest concentration of R1b in Norway is in the areas of Western and Southern Norway were there is a strong presence of Atlantids and Paleo-Atlantids.



If I remember correctly the highest frequency for R1b in Norway was in 'Møre og Romsdal' and 'Sogn og Fjordane'.

R1b in Norway table :

http://img713.imageshack.us/img713/5773/r1bnorway.png

Pallantides
07-04-2010, 06:13 PM
From Eupedia

R1b is the most common haplogroup in Western Europe, reaching over 80% of the population in Ireland, the Scottish Highlands, western Wales, the Atlantic fringe of France and the Basque country. It is also common in Anatolia and around the Caucasus, in parts of Russia and in Central and South Asia. Besides the Atlantic and North Sea coast of Europe, hotspots include the Po valley in north-central Italy (over 70%), the Ossetians of the North Caucasus (over 40%) and nearby Armenia (35%), the Bashkirs of the Urals region of Russia (50%), Turkmenistan (over 35%), the Hazara people of Afghanistan (35%), the Uyghurs of North-West China (20%) and the Newars of Nepal (11%). R1b-V88, a subclade specific to sub-Saharan Africa, is found in 60 to 95% of men in northern Cameroon.


R1b map on 23andMe
http://img411.imageshack.us/img411/2109/r1b.png

R1b1
http://img534.imageshack.us/img534/5861/r1b1.png

R1b1b2
http://img149.imageshack.us/img149/4900/r1b1b2.png

Pallantides
08-28-2010, 01:18 AM
delete

hereward
11-18-2010, 01:21 AM
R-S116 (P312)
Parent Clade: R-P310(S129)
Phylogenetic name:R1b1b2a1a2

http://img266.imageshack.us/img266/5364/s116k.jpg


R-U152 (S28)
Parent Clade: S116 (P312)
Phylogenetic name:R1b1b2a1a2d

http://img4.imageshack.us/img4/3445/u152.jpg


R-U106 (S21/M405)
Parent Clade: P310 (S129)
Phylogenetic name:R1b1b2a1a1

http://img844.imageshack.us/img844/1329/u106.jpg

Ibericus
11-18-2010, 01:25 AM
Here is the entire set :

http://1.bp.blogspot.com/_x6Y4ZgFsZdY/THayWhv-w7I/AAAAAAAAAYw/ew7YwZrSlJI/s1600/Myres+maps+R1b1b2a1+frequencies.jpeg

Pallantides
11-18-2010, 01:58 AM
R-U106 (S21/M405)
Parent Clade: P310 (S129)
Phylogenetic name:R1b1b2a1a1

http://img844.imageshack.us/img844/1329/u106.jpg

Are there any figures for R-U106 in Norway, I wonder if it's the most frequent branch of R1b in Scandinavia?

Ibericus
11-18-2010, 02:03 AM
Here is an interesting map of the types of R1b and its frequencies out of all the R1b, sorry there is no Norway :
http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_x6Y4ZgFsZdY/THaeRzxEhJI/AAAAAAAAAYo/YgRyAz2YnDU/s1600/R1b+sub-structure.png

hereward
11-19-2010, 09:28 PM
Are there any figures for R-U106 in Norway, I wonder if it's the most frequent branch of R1b in Scandinavia?


An unpublished research study of Norway found that the percentage of R-U106 made up
about 65% of the R-M269 (R1b1b2) group. Ten percent were R-U152, but all from the
southeast of the country north of Jutland (Vestfold, the Vik and surrounding Oslofjord).

http://davidkfaux.org/Angles_England_R_U152.pdf


The link below contains numbers of R-U106 per European nation; Norway is included.

Link: http://www.weston-genealogy.net/R_U106/U106_pop_density.html

This is all I can find for Norway, sorry; I am not sure how reliable it is.
I would imagine that R-U106 either makes up the majority of R1b in Scandinavia, or is the most numerous subclade of R1b found.

hereward
11-21-2010, 07:51 PM
Sampling
http://img221.imageshack.us/img221/9861/sampling.jpg


R-M73
Parent Clade:R-P297
Phylogenetic name:R1b1b1
http://img152.imageshack.us/img152/4991/rm73p.jpg


R-M269
Parent Clade: R-P297
Phylogenetic name:R1b1b2
http://img3.imageshack.us/img3/2603/m269.jpg


R-L23*
Parent Clade: R-M269
Phylogenetic name:R1b1b2a*
http://img541.imageshack.us/img541/1948/l23x412.jpg


R-M412 (L51)
Parent Clade: R-L23
Phylogenetic name:R1b1b2a1
http://img221.imageshack.us/img221/3086/m412all.jpg


R-P310 (S129,L11)
Parent Clade: R-M412
Phylogenetic name:R1b1b2a1a
http://img19.imageshack.us/img19/8865/l11all.jpg


R-P310* (L11*)
Parent Clade: R-P310
Phylogenetic name:R1b1b2a1a*
http://img99.imageshack.us/img99/3922/l11xu106s116.jpg


R-U106 (S21/M405)
Parent Clade: P310 (S129)
Phylogenetic name:R1b1b2a1a1
http://img46.imageshack.us/img46/1329/u106.jpg


R-P312 (S116)
Parent Clade: R-P310(S129)
Phylogenetic name:R1b1b2a1a2
http://img833.imageshack.us/img833/4624/s116all.jpg


R-P312* (S116*)
Parent Clade: R-P312 (S116)
Phylogenetic name:R1b1b2a1a2*
http://img12.imageshack.us/img12/7337/s116.jpg

hereward
11-21-2010, 07:53 PM
R-U152 (S28)
Parent Clade: P312 (S116)
Phylogenetic name:R1b1b2a1a2d
http://img87.imageshack.us/img87/3445/u152.jpg



R-M529 (S145,L21)
Parent Clade: P312 (S116)
Phylogenetic name:R1b1b2a1a2f
http://img703.imageshack.us/img703/3628/m529all.jpg


R-M529 xR-M222
http://img193.imageshack.us/img193/553/m529xm222.jpg


R-M222
Parent Clade: R-M529 (S145,L21)
Phylogenetic name:R1b1b2a1a2f2
http://img202.imageshack.us/img202/1044/rm222.jpg



PCA plot by R1b Subclades
http://img502.imageshack.us/img502/8061/plot1.jpg


PCA plot by defined populations
http://img249.imageshack.us/img249/9194/plot2.jpg

Savant
01-09-2011, 01:26 PM
No, it shouldn't. Neither really matter very much... Both y and mtDNA haplos are only really useful for studying ancient populations migrations, and a handful of other things. yDNA was studied more because it wasn't until more recently that we even COULD study mtDNA, not because of some big anti woman conspiracy...

The truth is autosomal data is what matters when studying personal ancestry, not allosomal (haplogroup) data. Haplogroup data will only tell you about one single ancestor, thousands of years ago directly up the male or female line. Autosomal DNA is what denotes actual genetic composition.


I think more attention should also be focused on the MT-DNA haplogroups as well.

Ibericus
02-18-2011, 02:41 PM
The truth is autosomal data is what matters when studying personal ancestry, not allosomal (haplogroup) data. Haplogroup data will only tell you about one single ancestor, thousands of years ago directly up the male or female line. Autosomal DNA is what denotes actual genetic composition.
Everybody knows this already. Stop repeating the same fuckin thing over and over.

Loddfafner
02-18-2011, 05:56 PM
Please avoid spinning in the same mud. And keep the mudslinging to the Big Fight.

Olavsson
06-08-2011, 11:31 AM
A little later, around 4,500 years ago, Haplogroup N3 began moving across from west of the Ural mountains. Haplogroup N3 follows closely the spread of the Finno-Ugric languages.

I thought N3 was older in the European context than that?

Also, the article doesn't mention R1a and the Indo-European connection...

MagnaLaurentia
06-09-2011, 10:47 AM
R1b1b2a1a2 (P312)

This Subclade has been viewed to account for one half of all European R1b1b2, it is found all over Europe but is mainly concentrated in Western Europe.
P312 Subclades

R1b1b2a1a2b – Defined by M153, this Subclade is found in high numbers amongst the Basques and Gascons, with a lower amount throughout Iberia.

R1b1b2a1a2c – Defined by M167, this subclade is found in relatively high numbers in both the Basques and Catalans. In the rest of Spain, plus France, Netherlands, Germany and England, it is found at below 5%.

R1b1b2a1a2d – Defined by U152/S28, this subclade reaches its peak in the alpine area’s, which has led some to associate the subclade with the ‘La Tene Culture’. Out side of Switzerland, Southern Germany and Northern Italy it drops in number dramatically in all directions.

R1b1b2a1a2e – Defined by L21. Current tests results indicate this subclade being fairly common in Ireland, Britain, Northern France, Germany and Scandinavia, but rare in Iberia and Italy.

R1b1b2a1a2f2 – Defined by M222, this subclade is heavily associated with Ireland and Scotland, especially northern Ireland. It is also quite abundant in Western Ireland.

R1b1b2a1a2f4 – Defined by L226/S168, it is found throughout Ireland, especially Western and Central Ireland.

Oh yeah!

If someone have information about the mtDNA H7a let me know!

Ibericus
07-30-2011, 02:45 AM
Haplogroup Q :

http://www.eupedia.com/images/content/Haplogroup-Q.gif

Afonso de Albuquerque
07-30-2011, 03:07 AM
After reading this topic i got confused with R1b-S116. What is the difference between R1b1b2a1a2 and R1b1b2a1a2*? Are they both considered S116? I also noticed it's sometimes written as S116*...

Logan
07-30-2011, 03:17 AM
After reading this topic i got confused with R1b-S116. What is the difference between R1b1b2a1a2 and R1b1b2a1a2*? Are they both considered S116? I also noticed it's sometimes written as S116*...

http://www.eupedia.com/europe/european_y-dna_haplogroups.shtml


http://www.buildinghistory.org/distantpast/peoplingeurope.shtml

Afonso de Albuquerque
07-30-2011, 03:30 AM
http://www.eupedia.com/europe/european_y-dna_haplogroups.shtml


http://www.buildinghistory.org/distantpast/peoplingeurope.shtml

Those two links don't really answer my question but thanks for replying.
I'm asking because i'm R1b1b2a1a2 without the * :)

Logan
07-30-2011, 04:09 AM
Those two links don't really answer my question but thanks for replying.
I'm asking because i'm R1b1b2a1a2 without the * :)


Pardon. I believe you will discover that the information is there, but not so easy to grasp.

The * denotes and as yet undefinable subclade, whereas the other might be defined into one of the current Gallo-Italo-alpine subclades. So it must be either U152, M126, M162, S139 or S144 with further testing.

I hope this makes better sense.

Afonso de Albuquerque
07-30-2011, 04:22 AM
Pardon. I believe you will discover that the information is there, but not so easy to grasp.

The * denotes and as yet undefinable subclade, whereas the other might be defined into one of the current Gallo-Italo-alpine subclades. So it must be either U152, M126, M162, S139 or S144 with further testing.

I hope this makes better sense.

It does. I never got what the * meant before. As for further testing, i think 23andme would have picked any subclade so maybe my haplogroup is just that one.

Logan
07-30-2011, 04:25 AM
It does. I never got what the * meant before. As for further testing, i think 23andme would have picked any subclade so maybe my haplogroup is just that one.

Perhaps, as was mine in another.

Pallantides
08-02-2011, 02:41 PM
Y-DNA Q frequency in Europe:
http://www.eupedia.com/images/content/Haplogroup-Q.gif

Barreldriver
08-02-2011, 03:22 PM
After reading this topic i got confused with R1b-S116. What is the difference between R1b1b2a1a2 and R1b1b2a1a2*? Are they both considered S116? I also noticed it's sometimes written as S116*...

The asterisk basically means there's a probability that there's undiscovered SNP's that could be found downstream in a later test (these usually starting out as "private SNP's" that become public once enough people test positive for them), the non-asterisk basically means you are the ancestral R-S116 with no more possibility of finding downstream mutations.

Pallantides
02-06-2012, 08:36 AM
Y-Haplogroups

I1 35-40 %
R1a 25-30 %
R1b ca 25 %
N1c1 ca 4 %
Q1a3 3-4 %
J 1-5 %
G2a3b 1-2 %
I2b 1-2 %

Mt-haplogroups

H ca 50 %
K ca 13 %
J 10-15 %
U5 ca 10 %
T ca 10 %
U4 ca 3 %
V 2-4 %
U4 2-3 %
W ca 2 %
X ca 2 %

Artek
02-07-2012, 01:50 PM
Y-Haplogroups
R1a 25-30 %

AR1an pride world wide. Are they mainly of Corded Ware ancestry?

Pallantides
02-07-2012, 03:26 PM
I think so, supposedly it came into Norway in two waves, there is an "older Scandinavian" and "younger Scandinavian" R1a.



It's estimated that R1b and R1a have about the same frequency in Norway, R1a being more common in central Norway while R1b have it's highest frequency in southwest Norway.

Milenko
04-12-2012, 11:39 AM
I did mine on Igenea so it dosent look like yours but this are my results

Paternal lineage:
Haplogroup E1b1b1a1b* V13
Ancient tribe Illyrians
Region of origin South-East Europe

safinator
04-12-2012, 11:42 AM
I did mine on Igenea so it dosent look like yours but this are my results

Paternal lineage:
Haplogroup E1b1b1a1b* [V13+ V27- P65- M35.2- L17- L143-]
Ancient tribe Illyrians
Region of origin South-East Europe

;);)

Milenko
04-12-2012, 11:45 AM
;);)

are u also E1b1b1a1b*

safinator
04-12-2012, 11:46 AM
are u also E1b1b1a1b*
IDK, i'm planning to do the test in May/June with 23and Me.

Milenko
04-12-2012, 11:53 AM
IDK, i'm planning to do the test in May/June with 23and Me.

its really exiting to know were your ancesters came from and stuff like that, but look at all the sites that are available, because some people say 23andme is bullshit, but people say that Igenea is also bullshit, but i thinks its just people who didint like there results or somthing they dont agree on what they have staded historicly, BUT if i hade to do it all over agian i would probobly choose

national geographic ancestry programs
https://genographic.nationalgeographic.com/genographic/index.html

safinator
04-12-2012, 11:55 AM
its really exiting to know were your ancesters came from and stuff like that, but look at all the sites that are available, because some people say 23andme is bullshit, but people say that Igenea is also bullshit, but i thinks its just people who didint like there results or somthing they dont agree on what they have staded historicly, BUT if i hade to do it all over agian i would probobly choose

national geographic ancestry programs
https://genographic.nationalgeographic.com/genographic/index.html
I believe 23andMe is the best one overall and yes, i don't have an high regard of Igenea.

Milenko
04-12-2012, 11:57 AM
I believe 23andMe is the best one overall and yes, i don't have an high regard of Igenea.

what is it u dont like about Igenea

Artek
04-12-2012, 01:23 PM
I believe 23andMe is the best one overall and yes, i don't have an high regard of Igenea.
Taking into account only Y-DNA tests, FTDNA is better.
In other terms(genome etc.,) 23andMe seems to overpower FTDNA.
I don't know much about Igenea apart from their stupid nomenclature - R1b=Celts, I1=Teutonics(?) if i remember correctly.

Milenko
04-12-2012, 02:25 PM
Taking into account only Y-DNA tests, FTDNA is better.
In other terms(genome etc.,) 23andMe seems to overpower FTDNA.
I don't know much about Igenea apart from their stupid nomenclature - R1b=Celts, I1=Teutonics(?) if i remember correctly.

Igenea dont use that anymore, they have taken away the statistic many people used befor and as u pointed out -their stupid nomenclature - R1b=Celts, I1=Teutonics(?) if i remember correctly

pasquale
11-10-2013, 05:08 AM
I have tested as R1b1a2a1a1b. I am waiting for the results of the U152 test (8 weeks so far). A person with the same last name as mine, but from a different area in Southern Italy is testing for L21. I tested negative for U106. The reason I tested U106 is my name is found wherever the Longobards held power, especially in the Italian provinces of Benevento and Salerno.